Golden Gloves Finals, Madison Square, 1981:  A minute before entering the ring. This fighter won the Golden Gloves for the third year in a row.

Golden Gloves Finals, Madison Square, 1981:

A minute before entering the ring. This fighter won the Golden Gloves for the third year in a row.

 Jerome Boxing Club, 1980:  A doctor checking a boxer's vision before the fight.

Jerome Boxing Club, 1980:

A doctor checking a boxer's vision before the fight.

 1980: Trainer Jaime Morales and Otis Brown, a.k.a. "Kid Chocolate."

1980: Trainer Jaime Morales and Otis Brown, a.k.a. "Kid Chocolate."

 Uptown Gym, Harlem, 1981:  His father asked me to do a portrait of him, "to put next to his trophies in our living room." I wish I could remember his name.

Uptown Gym, Harlem, 1981:

His father asked me to do a portrait of him, "to put next to his trophies in our living room." I wish I could remember his name.

 Lunar Gym, 1980:  Trainer Neil Ferrara and David Brown, nine years old, forty-five pounds, twenty-eight fights, and twenty-four wins.

Lunar Gym, 1980:

Trainer Neil Ferrara and David Brown, nine years old, forty-five pounds, twenty-eight fights, and twenty-four wins.

 Bed-Stuy Gym, 1981: Mark Breland won the National twice. He was the first fighter to win the Championship Belt and the Golden Gloves five times. He won a gold medal as a lightweight in the 1984 Olympics.  "When he was smaller he would tell me, 'I can't,' and I say, 'You ain't no worse if you can't.' So I figure that was why he was so good. Because he will try.  "When Mark first started, didn't nobody want to both with him because he was so skinny. Little skinny thing with braids in his hair. So I said, 'I'll take care of him.' One Saturday, I went up to his father and said, 'See this little skinny kid here? I'ma make a champ out of him.' And his father said, 'Yeah?' You think you can?' And sure 'nough, he went on and made the Olympics.  "A lot of them when they get up there on the top, they leave me. Except Mark. Mark the only kid that stick with me. He told his manager that as long as he fighting, I'll be there. He seem like he love me. I love him too."  -George Washington, Mark Breland's trainer

Bed-Stuy Gym, 1981: Mark Breland won the National twice. He was the first fighter to win the Championship Belt and the Golden Gloves five times. He won a gold medal as a lightweight in the 1984 Olympics.

"When he was smaller he would tell me, 'I can't,' and I say, 'You ain't no worse if you can't.' So I figure that was why he was so good. Because he will try.

"When Mark first started, didn't nobody want to both with him because he was so skinny. Little skinny thing with braids in his hair. So I said, 'I'll take care of him.' One Saturday, I went up to his father and said, 'See this little skinny kid here? I'ma make a champ out of him.' And his father said, 'Yeah?' You think you can?' And sure 'nough, he went on and made the Olympics.

"A lot of them when they get up there on the top, they leave me. Except Mark. Mark the only kid that stick with me. He told his manager that as long as he fighting, I'll be there. He seem like he love me. I love him too."

-George Washington, Mark Breland's trainer

 Golden Gloves Finals, Madison Square, 1981:  A minute before entering the ring. This fighter won the Golden Gloves for the third year in a row.
 Jerome Boxing Club, 1980:  A doctor checking a boxer's vision before the fight.
 1980: Trainer Jaime Morales and Otis Brown, a.k.a. "Kid Chocolate."
 Uptown Gym, Harlem, 1981:  His father asked me to do a portrait of him, "to put next to his trophies in our living room." I wish I could remember his name.
 Lunar Gym, 1980:  Trainer Neil Ferrara and David Brown, nine years old, forty-five pounds, twenty-eight fights, and twenty-four wins.
 Bed-Stuy Gym, 1981: Mark Breland won the National twice. He was the first fighter to win the Championship Belt and the Golden Gloves five times. He won a gold medal as a lightweight in the 1984 Olympics.  "When he was smaller he would tell me, 'I can't,' and I say, 'You ain't no worse if you can't.' So I figure that was why he was so good. Because he will try.  "When Mark first started, didn't nobody want to both with him because he was so skinny. Little skinny thing with braids in his hair. So I said, 'I'll take care of him.' One Saturday, I went up to his father and said, 'See this little skinny kid here? I'ma make a champ out of him.' And his father said, 'Yeah?' You think you can?' And sure 'nough, he went on and made the Olympics.  "A lot of them when they get up there on the top, they leave me. Except Mark. Mark the only kid that stick with me. He told his manager that as long as he fighting, I'll be there. He seem like he love me. I love him too."  -George Washington, Mark Breland's trainer

Golden Gloves Finals, Madison Square, 1981:

A minute before entering the ring. This fighter won the Golden Gloves for the third year in a row.

Jerome Boxing Club, 1980:

A doctor checking a boxer's vision before the fight.

1980: Trainer Jaime Morales and Otis Brown, a.k.a. "Kid Chocolate."

Uptown Gym, Harlem, 1981:

His father asked me to do a portrait of him, "to put next to his trophies in our living room." I wish I could remember his name.

Lunar Gym, 1980:

Trainer Neil Ferrara and David Brown, nine years old, forty-five pounds, twenty-eight fights, and twenty-four wins.

Bed-Stuy Gym, 1981: Mark Breland won the National twice. He was the first fighter to win the Championship Belt and the Golden Gloves five times. He won a gold medal as a lightweight in the 1984 Olympics.

"When he was smaller he would tell me, 'I can't,' and I say, 'You ain't no worse if you can't.' So I figure that was why he was so good. Because he will try.

"When Mark first started, didn't nobody want to both with him because he was so skinny. Little skinny thing with braids in his hair. So I said, 'I'll take care of him.' One Saturday, I went up to his father and said, 'See this little skinny kid here? I'ma make a champ out of him.' And his father said, 'Yeah?' You think you can?' And sure 'nough, he went on and made the Olympics.

"A lot of them when they get up there on the top, they leave me. Except Mark. Mark the only kid that stick with me. He told his manager that as long as he fighting, I'll be there. He seem like he love me. I love him too."

-George Washington, Mark Breland's trainer

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